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Catholic Church "Repentant" Over Irish Abuse Scandal, Past and Present Actions Contradict Its Rhetoric

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From Reuters:

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Irish bishops said they were "ashamed, humbled and repentant" about widespread abuse of children at Catholic-run schools after victims marched silently to the Irish parliament Wednesday to demand justice.

Disclosures of floggings, slave labor and gang rape in Ireland’s now defunct system of industrial and reform schools have shamed Irish people, particularly older ones who did not confront what a report last month described as endemic abuse.

"Heinous crimes were perpetrated against the most innocent and vulnerable, and vile acts with life-lasting effects were carried out under the guise of the mission of Jesus Christ," the Irish Bishops’ Conference said in a statement.

The leaders of the Catholic Church in Ireland met Pope Benedict Friday and he told them to make sure justice was done for all, "to bring healing to the survivors of abuse" and to prevent abuse from happening again, the bishops said.

The statement came hours after hundreds of victims of abuse, carrying children’s shoes and wearing white ribbons symbolizing their lost youth, marched to parliament accompanied by thousands of other protestors.

"It was as if you were inside prison and when you come out you don’t talk about it," said Marina Permaul, 66, who was brought up "military style" by nuns in the western county of Galway.

"You don’t talk about it even to your children," said Permaul, who arrived from London to attend the march. "You’re too ashamed of it all, and in any case would they believe you? You didn’t dare speak out against a religious order."

COMPENSATION

Organizers of the march, held to coincide with a parliamentary debate on the report, have expressed anger that the debate was postponed to allow parliament to deal with a motion of confidence in the government.

"It really emphasizes again that the state hasn’t actually understood one iota of what it was like for 165,000 children who went through 216 institutions," said victim Christine Buckley.

The inquiry, chaired by High Court Justice Sean Ryan, criticized religious authorities for covering up the crimes and the Department of Education for colluding in the silence. It noted children were also preyed upon by foster parents, volunteer workers and employers [. . .]

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